Barrett Brown: Anonymous can do OpKKK, OpIceISIS, OpJihadi, OpDaesh, OpJihadi, OpISIS, OpDomesticTerrorism and OpPedo but not OpCartel. Anonymous is afraid to Mexican Drug Cartels like the Los Zetas Drug Cartel in Mexico. Political Islam, ISIS Islamic State (ISIL/IS) Daesh, Al Qaeda and Hezbollah are now in Southern Mexico and Latin America and Europe

Barrett Brown: Anonymous can do OpKKK, OpIceISIS, OpJihadi, OpDaesh, OpJihadi, OpISIS, OpDomesticTerrorism and OpPedo but not OpCartel. Anonymous is afraid to Mexican Drug Cartels like the Los Zetas Drug Cartel in Mexico. Political Islam, ISIS Islamic State (ISIL/IS) Daesh, Al Qaeda and Hezbollah are now in Southern Mexico and Latin America and Europe

Barrett Brown
Barrett Brown 2017.jpg

Barrett Brown in Denton, Texas, 2017
Born Barrett Lancaster Brown
August 14, 1981 (age 36)
Dallas, Texas
Nationality American
Occupation Journalist, Activist
Known for Project PM
Website

Barrett Lancaster Brown (born August 14, 1981) is an American journalist, essayist and satirist. He founded Project PM, a research collaboration and wiki, to facilitate analysis of the troves of hacked emails and other leaked information concerning the inner workings of the cyber-military-industrial complex.[1]

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In January 2015, Brown was sentenced to 63 months in federal prison for the crimes of accessory after the fact, obstruction of justice, and threatening a federal officer stemming from the FBI’s investigation into the 2012 Stratfor email leak. Prosecutors had previously brought other charges associated with his sharing of an HTTP link to the leaked Stratfor data, but those charges were dropped in 2014.[2][3][4][5] As part of his sentence, Brown was also required to pay almost $900,000 to Stratfor.[6]

Prior to 2011, Brown had ties with the hacktivist collective Anonymous.

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Anonymous is a loosely associated international network of activist and hacktivist entities. A website nominally associated with the group describes it as “an Internet gathering” with “a very loose and decentralized command structure that operates on ideas rather than directives”.[2] The group became known for a series of well-publicized distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks on government, religious, and corporate websites.[3]

Anonymous originated in 2003 on the imageboard 4chan, representing the concept of many online and offline community users simultaneously existing as an anarchic, digitized global brain.[4][5][6] Anonymous members (known as “Anons”) can be distinguished in public by the wearing of Guy Fawkes masks in the style portrayed in the graphic novel and film V for Vendetta.[7] However this may not always be the case, as some of the collective prefer to instead cover their face without using the well-known mask as a disguise.

In its early form, the concept was adopted by a decentralized online community acting anonymously in a coordinated manner, usually toward a loosely self-agreed goal, and primarily focused on entertainment, or often referred to as “lulz“. Beginning with 2008’s Project Chanology—a series of protests, pranks, and hacks targeting the Church of Scientology—the Anonymous collective became increasingly associated with collaborative hacktivism on a number of issues internationally. Individuals claiming to align themselves with Anonymous undertook protests and other actions (including direct action) in retaliation against copyright-focused campaigns by motion picture and recording industry trade associations. Later targets of Anonymous hacktivism included government agencies of the U.S., Israel, Tunisia, Uganda, and others; the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant; child pornography sites; copyright protection agencies; the Westboro Baptist Church; and corporations such as PayPal, MasterCard, Visa, and Sony. Anons have publicly supported WikiLeaks and the Occupy movement. Related groups LulzSec and Operation AntiSec carried out cyberattacks on U.S. government agencies, media, video game companies, military contractors, military personnel, and police officers, resulting in the attention of law enforcement to the groups’ activities. Some actions by members of the group have been described as being anti-Zionist. It has threatened to cyber-attack Israel and engaged in the “#OpIsrael” cyber-attacks of Israeli websites on Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) in 2013.[8]

Dozens of people have been arrested for involvement in Anonymous cyberattacks, in countries including the US, UK, Australia, the Netherlands, Spain, India and Turkey. Evaluations of the group’s actions and effectiveness vary widely. Supporters have called the group “freedom fighters”[9] and digital Robin Hoods[10] while critics have described them as “a cyber lynch-mob”[11] or “cyber terrorists”.[12] In 2012, Time called Anonymous one of the “100 most influential people” in the world.[13]

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Links:

https://www.slashgear.com/anonymous-opcartel-ends-over-fears-of-death-and-violence-07193580/

2. https://www.mhpbooks.com/fourth-blogger-killed-by-mexican-cartel-opcartel-spokesman-on-the-run/

3. http://www.seeker.com/anonymous-spokesman-flees-over-safety-concerns-1765504062.html

From Slashgear:

In the next attempt to actually do something good was a battle against some of the Mexican drug cartels that are being so violent. The plan by Anonymous was to out the details on people that were helping the cartels. Plans were to release details on taxi drivers, journalists, police, and others assisting the Zeta cartel.

The problem was that some security experts reported that the drug cartel was hiring security experts to track down the members of Anonymous that participated. The alleged abduction of a member of Anonymous was apparently some of the reason for the plan. Some of the Anonymous members are now saying that abduction never happened. Anonymous has since backed away from its plan to out Zeta helpers. Anonymous won’t release any details on the Zeta cartel out of fear that people will be killed.

From Melville House:

Mexican drug cartel Zetas killed and beheaded a blogger in Nuevo Laredo, a city “all but” controlled by the violent gang. The blogger “posted news of shootouts and other activities of the Zetas” on the blog El Vivo. He was found with a note ”This happened to me for not understanding that I shouldn’t report on the social networks.”

From Seeker:

Though Anonymous apparently called off their Operation Cartel (#OpCartel) after Los Zetas allegedly returned the kidnapped victim, Barrett Brown has decided to flee his Dallas home over concerns for his security. On Nov. 8, he tweeted, “I’ve got ex-military people releasing info on me and family. Have to leave Texas.”

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Islam in Japan: The Ainu of Hokkaido and Ryukyu / Ryukyuan (Okinawan) of Okinawa will be the Indigenous Muslims of Japan

Islam in Japan: The Ainu of Hokkaido and Ryukyu / Ryukyuan (Okinawan) of Okinawa will be the Indigenous Muslims of Japan

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The Ainu or the Aynu (Ainu アィヌ Aynu; Japanese: アイヌ Ainu; Russian: Айны Ajny), in the historical Japanese texts Ezo/Emishi/Ebisu (蝦夷) or Ainu (アイヌ), are an indigenous people of Japan (Hokkaido, and formerly northeastern Honshu) and Russia (Sakhalin, the Kuril Islands and formerly the Kamchatka Peninsula).[7]

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The Ryukyuan or Lewchewan[4] people (琉球民族? Ryūkyū minzoku, Okinawan: Ruuchuu minzuku), or Uchinaanchu (Okinawan: ウチナーンチュ) are the indigenous peoples of the Ryukyu Islands between the islands of Kyushu and Taiwan.[5] Politically, they live in either Okinawa Prefecture or Kagoshima Prefecture. Their languages make up the Ryukyuan language family,[6] considered to be one of the two branches of the Japonic language family, the other one being Japanese and its dialects.[5]

Ryukyuans are not a recognized minority group in Japan, as Japanese authorities consider them just a subgroup of the Japanese people, akin to the Yamato people and Ainu. Although unrecognized, Ryukyuans constitute the largest ethnolinguistic minority group in Japan, with 1.3 million living in Okinawa Prefecture alone. There is also a considerable Ryukyuan diaspora. As many as 600,000 more ethnic Ryukyuans and their descendants are dispersed elsewhere in Japan and worldwide; mostly in Hawaii[7] and, to a lesser extent, in other territories where there is also a sizable Japanese diaspora. In some countries, the Ryukyuan and Japanese diaspora are not differentiated so there are no reliable statistics for the former.

Recent genetic and anthropological studies indicate that the Ryukyuans are significantly related to the Ainu people and share the ancestry with the indigenous prehistoric Jōmon period (pre 10,000–1,000 BCE) people, who arrived from Southeast Asia, and with the Yamato people who are mostly an admixture of the Yayoi period (1,000 BCE–300 CE) migrants from Northeast Asia (specifically the Korean peninsula).[3][8][9][10] The Ryukyuans have a specific culture with some matriarchal elements, native religion, and cuisine which had fairly late 12th century introduction of rice. The population lived on the islands in isolation for many centuries, and in the 14th century from the three divided Okinawan political polities emerged the Ryukyu Kingdom (1429–1879) which continued the maritime trade and tributary relations started in 1372 with Ming dynasty China.[5] In 1609 the kingdom was invaded by Satsuma Domain which allowed its independence being in vassal status because the Tokugawa Japan was prohibited to trade with China, being in dual subordinate status between both China and Japan.[11]

United Nations special rapporteur on discrimination and racism Doudou Diène in his 2006 report,[23] noted discrimination and xenophobia against the Okinawa people, with the most serious discrimination they endure linked to the American military bases on their island for which should be launched an investigation in respect to the fundamental human rights.[24]

Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN)

The Sandinista National Liberation Front (Spanish: Frente Sandinista de Liberación Nacional, FSLN) is now a democratic socialist[5][6] political party in Nicaragua.

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Sandinista National Liberation Front
Frente Sandinista de Liberación Nacional
Chairperson Daniel Ortega
Founder Carlos Fonseca
Founded July 19, 1961; 55 years ago
Headquarters Managua
Newspaper El Pueblo Presidente
La Voz del Sandinismo
Ideology Sandinismo
Democratic socialism[1]
Left-wing nationalism
Christian left[2][3][4]
Political position Left-wing
Continental affiliation Foro de São Paulo,
COPPPAL
International affiliation Socialist International
Colors                Red, black, white
National Assembly
71 / 92

Central American Parliament
15 / 20

Party flag
Flag of the FSLN.svg

Its members are called Sandinistas [sandiˈnistas] in both English and Spanish. The party is named after Augusto César Sandino, who led the Nicaraguan resistance against the United States occupation of Nicaragua in the 1930s.[7]

The FSLN overthrew Anastasio Somoza Debayle in 1979, ending the Somoza dynasty, and established a revolutionary government in its place.[8][9] Following their seizure of power, the Sandinistas ruled Nicaragua from 1979 to 1990, first as part of a Junta of National Reconstruction. Following the resignation of centrist members from this Junta, the FSLN took exclusive power in March 1981. They instituted a policy of mass literacy, devoted significant resources to health care, and promoted gender equality,[10] but came under international criticism for human rights abuses, mass execution and oppression of indigenous peoples.[11][12]

A militia, known as the Contras, was formed in 1981 to overthrow the Sandinista government and was funded and trained by the US Central Intelligence Agency.[13] In 1984 elections were held[14] but were boycotted by some opposition parties. The FSLN won the majority of the votes,[15] and those who opposed the Sandinistas won approximately a third of the seats. The civil war between the Contras and the government continued until 1989. After revising the constitution in 1987, and after years of fighting the Contras, the FSLN lost what many consider the first truly democratic election in 1990 to Violeta Barrios de Chamorro but retained a plurality of seats in the legislature.

The FSLN remains one of Nicaragua’s two leading parties. The FSLN often polls in opposition to the Constitutionalist Liberal Party, or PLC. In the 2006 Nicaraguan general election, former FSLN President Daniel Ortega was re-elected President of Nicaragua with 38.7% of the vote compared to 29% for his leading rival, bringing in the country’s second Sandinista government after 16 years of the opposition winning elections. Ortega and the FSLN were re-elected again in the presidential election of November 2011.

Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front (FMLN)

Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front (FMLN)

The Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front (in Spanish: Frente Farabundo Martí para la Liberación Nacional, FMLN) is one of the two major political parties in El Salvador.

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The FMLN was formed as an umbrella group on October 10, 1980, from five leftist guerrilla organizations:

The FMLN was one of the main participants in the Salvadoran Civil War. After peace accords were signed in 1992, all armed FMLN units were demobilized and their organization became a legal left-wing political party in El Salvador.

On March 15, 2009, the FMLN won the presidential elections with former journalist Mauricio Funes as its candidate. Two months earlier in municipal and legislative elections, the FMLN won the majority of the mayoralties in the country and a plurality of the National Assembly seats.

Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front
Frente Farabundo Martí para la Liberación Nacional
Leader Medardo González
Founded October 10, 1980
Newspaper Frente
Youth wing Farabundo Martí Youth
Ideology Socialism
Syndicalism
Political position Left-wing
International affiliation São Paulo Forum,
Progressive Alliance[1]
Colors Red
Seats in the Legislative Assembly
31 / 84

Mayors
85 / 262

Central American Parliament
8 / 20

Website
www.fmln.org.sv

Civil war and emergence

On December 17, 1979, in period of national crisis, the three dominant organizations (FPL, RN and PCS) of the Salvadoran left formed the Coordinadora Político-Militar. The CPM’s first manifesto was released on January 10, 1980, and the day after, the Coordinadora Revolucionaria de Masas was formed as a union of revolutionary mass organizations. CRM later merged with the Frente Democrático Salvadoreño to form the Frente Democrático Revolucionario.

It is alleged by the United States that some credit for the unity of the five organizations that formed the FMLN may belong to Cuba’s Fidel Castro, who facilitated negotiation between the groups in Havana in December 1979. However, neither the Cuban nor Soviet government were significantly responsible for forming FMLN, although it received some of its arms and supplies from the Soviet Union and Cuba. While all five groups called themselves revolutionaries and socialists, they had serious ideological and practical differences, and there had been serious conflicts, even including in some cases bloodshed, between some of the groups during the 1970s.

On May 22, 1980, the success of negotiations led to the union of the major guerrilla forces under one flag. The Unified Revolutionary Directorate (Dirección Revolucionaria Unificada) was created by the FPL, RN, ERP and PCS. DRU consisted of three Political Commission members from each of these four organizations. The DRU manifesto declared, “There will be only one leadership, only one military plan and only one command, only one political line.” Despite continued infighting DRU succeeded in coordinating the group’s efforts and equipped forces.

Banner used until 1992.

On October 10, 1980, the four organizations formed the Frente Farabundo Martí de Liberación Nacional (FMLN), taking the name of Farabundo Martí, the peasant leader during the 1932 Salvadoran peasant massacre. In December 1980, the Salvadoran branch of the Partido Revolucionario de los Trabajadores Centroamericanos broke away from its central organization and affiliated itself to FMLN. Thus the FMLN was composed of the following organizations at the time of the peace accords in 1992 (listed in the order of size):

Youth organizations of FMLN at the time of armed struggle included:

Student unions (High Schools):

  • MERS – Movimiento Estudiantil Revolucionario de Secundaria (BPR)
  • BRES – Brigadas Revolucionarias de Estudiantes de Secundaria (MLP)
  • LPS – Ligas Populares de Secundaria (LP-28)
  • AES – Asociación de Estudiantes de Secundaria (PCS)
  • ARDES – Acción Revolucionaria de Estudiantes de Secundaria (FAPU)

Student unions (Universities):

  • AGEUS – Asociación General de Estudiantes de la Universidad de El Salvador
  • FUERSA – Frente Universitario de Estudiantes Revolucionarios “Salvador Allende”

Armed struggle

A Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front (FMLN) soldier takes aim during a wartime “road advisory” near Suchitoto, El Salvador (1984).

After the formation of the FMLN, the group organized its first major military offensive on January 10, 1981. During this offensive, the FMLN established operational control over large sections of Morazán and Chalatenango departments, which remained largely under guerrilla control throughout the rest of the civil war. Insurgents ranged from children to the elderly, both male and female, and most were trained in FMLN camps in the mountains and jungles of El Salvador to learn military techniques.

Another large FMLN offensive was in November 1989. In that offensive, the FMLN caught Salvadoran government and military off guard by taking control of large sections of the country and entering the capital, San Salvador. In San Salvador, the FMLN quickly took control of many of the poor neighborhoods until the military bombed their positions—including residential neighborhoods[2] to drive the FMLN out. One of the most famous battles in San Salvador took place in the Sheraton Hotel (13°41′27.36″N 89°14′31.15″W), where guerrillas and army soldiers battled floor by floor. The FMLN’s November 1989 offensive did not succeed in overthrowing the government. Many analysts pointed to the FMLN’s show of strength in the 1989 offensive as the turning point in the war, where it became clear that the government would not be able to defeat the FMLN militarily. Soon after the November 1989 offensive, the U.S. government started to support negotiations to end the civil war, whereas up to that point they had pursued a policy of military defeat of the FMLN. Since the U.S. government was the major funder of the Salvadoran government and military, it exercised considerable influence over the course of events. When the U.S. began to advocate negotiations instead of a military solution, a negotiated peace accord between the FMLN and the Salvadoran government was reached in fairly short order in 1992, despite a few incidents that could have marred the accord, such as the high-profile murder of the peace-seeking FPL commandante Antonio Cardenal, aka Jesus Rojas.

National Liberation Army (ELN)

National Liberation Army (ELN)

National Liberation Army
Participant in the Colombian armed conflict (1964–present)
Flag of ELN.svg Elnlogo.PNG

Flag and logo of the ELN
Active 1964 – present
Ideology Marxism–Leninism
Liberation theology
National liberation
Foco theory
Leaders Antonio García
Francisco Galán
Area of operations Colombia
Strength 2,500 [1]( 2016) [2][3][4]
Opponents Government of Colombia
Right-wing paramilitary groups
Government of the United States

The National Liberation Army (Spanish: Ejército de Liberación Nacional, ELN) is an armed group involved in the continuing Colombian armed conflict,[5] which has existed in Colombia since 1964.

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The ELN advocate a composite communist ideology of Marxism and liberation theology. They conduct military operations throughout the national territory of Colombia; in 2013, it was estimated that the ELN forces consisted of between 1,380 and 3,000 guerrillas.[2][3][4]