Trinitario

Trinitario

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Trinitario
Founded 1989
Founding locatio New York City Department of Corrections
Territory New York City, Upstate New York, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Hudson
County, Philadelphia, New Jersey, Boston, Hartford, Bridgeport, Providence, Miami, Orlando, Tampa, Spain
Ethnicity Hispanic (Primarily Dominican)
Membership 25,000 worldwide
Criminal activities Drug Trafficking, Weapons trafficking, Assault, Witness intimidation, Murder, Robberies
Rivals Dominicans Don’t Play, United Blood Nation, Latin Kings

The Trinitarios or 3ni are a violent New York-based multinational organization composed of Hispanics.Trinitario was established in 1989 within the New York State prison system[2] and since spilled into the streets, with chapters in all five boroughs of New York City. Reports of Trinitario activity have also been made in New Jersey, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Alaska, Spain, and the Dominican Republic. In Long Island places like Freeport, Brentwood, and Port Jefferson Station have a 3ni presence. It is considered the fastest-growing gang in New York, recruiting members from high schools local to the gang’s area of activity, with the highest numbers of reports coming from Chelsea, Gramercy Park, Harlem, the Morris Heights section of The Bronx and Washington Heights.[Their slogan is “Dios, Patria, y Libertad”, which means “God, Fatherland, and Liberty”.Trinitario is a Hispanic organization formed in prison, providing protection and unity for Hispanic inmates within the New York City Department of Corrections. The name “Trinitario” means the Trinity Brotherhood in Spanish. The public wrongly associates their name with La Trinitaria secret society that served as the keystone in the quest for independence in the Dominican Republic. Members view themselves as being, like the founding fathers, freedom fighters and protectors for Hispanic people, though in this case within the New York City Department of Corrections.It was originally composed of members of smaller, now-defunct Hispanic gangs such as Los Papi Chulos, Dominican Power, and Dominican Posse, as well as unaffiliated drug dealers. Many members remained affiliated with the gang after serving their sentences, and began recruiting in their neighborhoods, the path many prison gangs take as they become street gangs.

They are known (as featured on an episode of Gangland) for the use of the machete as their weapon of choice.

Locations and Membership

About 30,000 members worldwide (France, Philippines, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Dominican Republic etc.). One of the largest street gangs in NYC with over 10,000 members, and 10,000 more in other states like Florida, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Alaska, and Pennsylvania.

Extension

Trinitarios is one of New York City’s most violent and fastest rising street gangs. With their reach spreading into neighboring New Jersey and beyond, these machete-welding Latino gangsters are now battling older, more established gangs, like the Latin Kings and Bloods, for control of the streets and the lucrative east coast drug market. What started as a prison gang has now become a dominant presence in the boroughs and the suburbs; as they prey on communities in the Tri-State area, Trinitarios are quickly rising on the radar of law enforcement agencies.According to New York Law Enforcement, the Trinitarios are the fastest growing gang in New York. According to the DEA and the NYPD they may be considered the toughest gang in NYC.According to the FBI National Gang Assessment for 2010, the Trinitarios have become a threat on the East Coast.[2] In addition, they have become an emerging gang in the New England area.

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