Lulzsec: Anonymous can do OpKKK, OpISIS and OpPedo but not OpCartel. Anonymous is afraid to Mexican Drug Cartels in Mexico. Political Islam is now in Southern Mexico and Latin America

Lulzsec: Anonymous can do OpKKK, OpISIS and OpPedo but not OpCartel. Anonymous is afraid to Mexican Drug Cartels in Mexico. Political Islam is now in Southern Mexico and Latin America

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Lulz Security, commonly abbreviated as LulzSec, was[1] a black hat computer hacking group that claimed responsibility for several high profile attacks, including the compromise of user accounts from Sony Pictures in 2011. The group also claimed responsibility for taking the CIA website offline.[2] Some security professionals have commented that LulzSec has drawn attention to insecure systems and the dangers of password reuse.[3] It has gained attention due to its high profile targets and the sarcastic messages it has posted in the aftermath of its attacks. One of the founders of LulzSec was computer security specialist Hector Monsegur, who used the online moniker Sabu. He later helped law enforcement track down other members of the organization as part of a plea deal. At least four associates of LulzSec were arrested in March 2012 as part of this investigation. British authorities had previously announced the arrests of two teenagers they allege are LulzSec members T-flow and Topiary.

At just after midnight (BST, UT+01) on 26 June 2011, LulzSec released a “50 days of lulz” statement, which they claimed to be their final release, confirming that LulzSec consisted of six members, and that their website is to be shut down.[1] This breaking up of the group was unexpected.[4] The release included accounts and passwords from many different sources. Despite claims of retirement, the group committed another hack against newspapers owned by News Corporation on 18 July, defacing them with false reports regarding the death of Rupert Murdoch. The group helped launch Operation AntiSec, a joint effort involving LulzSec, Anonymous, and other hackers.

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